Anyone missing Library.nu?

Hi everyone,
I hope many are missing library.nu very much…I used the site heavily in the past few years and was sad and outraged when it was forcibly closed…anyway, one useful alternative is

http://en.bookfi.org/

There are other available sites which claims to be an alternative that I found that’s not really the case. However, this site is quite close to library.nu /gigapedia…by whichever name you liked to call the site that was once so dear to us all. One good thing about this site is the files are in its own server, so the recent attack on all free file sharing sites (like ifile.it, mediafire etc etc) is not going to affect it.

Soon I am planning to explore an alternative to mediafire, which I expect will be a difficult task…by the way, mediafire is still on….but they are forced to delete many files…so any old links to mediafire sharing a movie or something is probably dead….however, it takes a little bit of time to delete a particular file (I mean for “them” to find out that it is sharing something which is “illegal” in their f**king sense of legality)….so mediafire might still help you to get a rip of a recent movie if you get lucky…or a very old one which not many people  have downloaded (hence “they” did not suspect anything)….4shared is a suggestion that I heard often in this regard….I shall let you know about my own views…

1st July, 2012
By suggestion from my friend and colleague Debayan Maiti, here is another such site…
http://bib.tiera.ru/
Please post your feedbacks as comments and please let me know of any other such sites…

Another great article….

http://kelty.org/or/papers/Kelty_FreeScience_2005.pdf
This is a brilliant article I found on the internet…
Can not resist myself quoting at length from it……

”    This claim is remarkable, but not dissimilar to that remarkable claim of
OS/FS (particularly open source) advocates—that openness results in the
creation of better software. Merton here claims as much for science. The
incentive to produce science depends on the public recognition of prior-
ity. The systems involved in making this property stick to its owner are
reliable publishing, evaluation, transmission, dissemination, and ulti-
mately, the archiving of scientific papers, equations, technologies, and
data. As stated previously, this priority is inalienable: when it enters this
system of registration, it is there for good, dislodged only in the case of
undiscovered priority or hidden fraud. It is not alienable intellectual prop-
erty, but constant; irretrievably and forever after granted. Only long after
the fact can diligent historians dislodge it.
Who grants this property? The key is in Merton’s paradox: “the more
widely scientists make their intellectual property available to others, the
more securely it becomes identified as their property” (Garfield 1979, vii).
That is, no one (or everyone) grants it. The wider the network of people
who know that Boyle is responsible for demonstrating that under a con-
stant temperature gas will compress as pressure is increased, the more
impossible it becomes to usurp. Only by having a public science in this
sense is that kind of lasting property possible. A privatized science, on the
other hand, must eternally defend its property with the threat of force, or
worse, of litigation. While a public science tends toward ever greater cir-
culation of information in order to assure compensation in reputation, a
private science must develop ever more elaborate rules and technologies
for defining information and circumscribing its use. Not only is a private
science inefficient; it also sacrifices the one thing that a public science
promises: progress. “

A brilliant article regarding library.nu

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2012/02/2012227143813304790.html

A must read article for every freethinking person….
“This is so much the case that it can’t be long before reading a book – making an unauthorised copy in your brain – is also made illegal.”–an excellent comment , correctly affirming the element of ridicule and irony and absurdity in the present day ‘laws’ regarding ‘intellectual property rights’…. I really can not fathom what intellectual contributions do the publishing houses make so as to enable the judiciary to protect their ‘intellectual property’ rights….